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Momma loves her a boy band.

Momma loves her a boy band.

Tags: the wanted
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TUMBLR I MISS YOU SO MUCH

Fucking job.

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thrillingtales:

#studentloans

(Source: theblackpearlscaptain, via what-ladybird)

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amygloriouspond:

I can retire now.

(via iwilllumosyourworld)

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iwilllumosyourworld:

I may despise the Vogue cover, but this is some TRUTH.

iwilllumosyourworld:

I may despise the Vogue cover, but this is some TRUTH.

(Source: your-better-than-that)

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supsquark:

why the fuck is there so much stigma surrounding going to the movies by yourself why the fuck do you need someone to help you sit in the dark and look at a wall for two hours “oh look at that dork they don’t even have a friend to ignore for the entire duration of this event”

(via majesticmeerkat)

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cams-ward:

black & white competition potential entry (1/3)

(via nanienooo)

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npr:

nprontheroad:

The harbor is the heartbeat of Cordova.   It’s lined with canneries, a net-making shop and marine supply house, hardware stores, a grocery and other merchants who provision the fishing fleet before they set out for Prince William sound.  Early halibut is just coming in.  Salmon is not far behind.  Before the Exxon-Valdez spill this would have been peak herring season, but the fishery has not recovered 25 years later. (Debbie Elliott, @nprdebelliott)

This week, NPR’s Debbie Elliot and Marisa Peñaloza are in the isolated fishing village of Cordova, Alaska. Travel with them to learn about what has happened in the 25 years since March 24, 1989 when 11,000,000 gallons of crude oil was dumped into the Prince William Sound.
All of NPR’s reporting on the anniversary of the spill can be found here.

I had to scroll back and do a double-take. “Is this really about Cordova, ALASKA?” Because I do in fact know someone who lives there. And works on a salmon fishing boat. And is also a photographer.Bookmarking for later perusal…

npr:

nprontheroad:

The harbor is the heartbeat of Cordova.   It’s lined with canneries, a net-making shop and marine supply house, hardware stores, a grocery and other merchants who provision the fishing fleet before they set out for Prince William sound.  Early halibut is just coming in.  Salmon is not far behind.  Before the Exxon-Valdez spill this would have been peak herring season, but the fishery has not recovered 25 years later. (Debbie Elliott, @nprdebelliott)

This week, NPR’s Debbie Elliot and Marisa Peñaloza are in the isolated fishing village of Cordova, Alaska. Travel with them to learn about what has happened in the 25 years since March 24, 1989 when 11,000,000 gallons of crude oil was dumped into the Prince William Sound.

All of NPR’s reporting on the anniversary of the spill can be found here.

I had to scroll back and do a double-take. “Is this really about Cordova, ALASKA?” Because I do in fact know someone who lives there. And works on a salmon fishing boat. And is also a photographer.

Bookmarking for later perusal…

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"A headline is like a promise. Always deliver on that promise."

— Overheard at The Washington Post (via washingtonpost)

(via npr)